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Oral history and memoryThe history of the international process of Indigenous Peoples narrated by elders and carried forward by indigenous youth in a creative manner for future generations: the transmission of oral culture expressed through workshops in the field.

Oral history and memory


The history of the international process of Indigenous Peoples narrated by elders and carried forward by indigenous youth in a creative manner for future generations: the transmission of oral culture expressed through workshops in the field.

To be a Docip volunteer involves putting one’s skills at the service of indigenous delegates during their participation in the UN arena.

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Docip @Docip_en 22-11-17 - 17:53
RT @UN4Indigenous: #ONU 3er. Comité adopta resolución anual sobre “Derechos de #PueblosIndígenas” Descargue el texto en https://t.co/VOfea7…
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Over the past 30+ years, 5,000 Indigenous Peoples, representing 370 million people, or 5% of the world's population (more than 90 countries), have advanced from a situation in which their existence was denied to one in which their rights are recognized at the international level. Certain key moments mark this path to international recognition where Indigenous Peoples have become international actors and important subjects of rights. Read more...

Two Symposiums were held in Geneva whose purpose was to collect the testimonials of the elders who launched the UN process of recognition of Indigenous Peoples' rights. This history has been archived and disseminated among the younger generations so that they may become, in turn, the standard bearers of their culture. Read more ...