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Programmes, agencies and related international legal instrumentsRead here about which programmes, agencies or legal instruments you should approach for the promotion and defence of your indigenous rights

Programmes, agencies and related international legal instruments


Read here about which programmes, agencies or legal instruments you should approach for the promotion and defence of your indigenous rights

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Read here about which programmes, agencies or legal instruments you should approach or use for the promotion and defence of your indigenous rights

The United Nations is a vast labyrinth made up of several routes intended to achieve its objectives. The goal here is not to name all of the myriad bodies, commissions, agencies, etc., of the UN, but rather, to introduce a few. It is worth noting that they are described here without any prioritization. It is important to be informed of the existence of these programmes or agencies because it may be possible to access, for example, their in-country trainings, technical support/assistance, funding, etc.

Below is a list in alphabetical order

It is important to be aware that in some cases there are international legal instruments related to the agencies. For example, Convention 169 concerning the Rights of Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Independent Countries was adopted in 1989 under the aegis of the International Labour Organization (ILO). Before ILO Convention 169, there was ILO Convention 107 (Convention on Indigenous and Tribal Populations), a convention long criticized for its integrationist approach. Later, in 2007, the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly.

There are therefore two specific international legal instruments for Indigenous Peoples. Convention 169, which is binding for States, is still open to ratification; at this time 20 countries have ratified it. With respect to the Declaration, it has no binding effect in international law since it is a soft law. However, it contains general principles and rules of law that contribute to a legal rationale for the promotion and defence of Indigenous Peoples' rights.