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Indigenous Peoples at the United Nations There are forums, mechanisms, procedures, etc., at the United Nations for denouncing violations of the rights of Indigenous Peoples, as well as for the promotion and defence of these rights. Although the United Nations’ international system may truly be a complex maze, this section is intended to help you begin to become familiarized with it.

Indigenous Peoples at the United Nations


There are forums, mechanisms, procedures, etc., at the United Nations for denouncing violations of the rights of Indigenous Peoples, as well as for the promotion and defence of these rights. Although the United Nations’ international system may truly be a complex maze, this section is intended to help you begin to become familiarized with it.

To be a Docip volunteer involves putting one’s skills at the service of indigenous delegates during their participation in the UN arena.

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Docip @Docip_en 21-08-17 - 09:05
Starting today in Geneva: 79th session of the WG on arbitrary detention#WGAD#ArbitraryDetention… https://t.co/BgHYf5mNac


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A wide range of special procedures are available within the United Nations for members of civil society. For Indigenous Peoples, these specifically include the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but there are also other thematic mandates, as well as country-specific mandates. Read more...

This involves committees of independent experts that have a mandate to monitor the States' implementation of the international legal instruments that they ratify. Members of civil society can send alternative (or "shadow") reports on the situation of human rights to the various committees. Indigenous Peoples may participate in sending these reports. Read more...

Every four and a half years, various countries come before the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), a mechanism of the Human Rights Council, to assess the human rights situation within their national territory. At the end of each review, a report is made public in which recommendations are made to the State in question. The UPR requires that members of civil society be involved in the groundwork, and Indigenous Peoples may participate in this. Read more...